Sunday school supplement #7: the value

Sunday, 10 June 2007

Dying on the cross to save mankind… Priceless.

I’m sure I’m not the first to do this bit but I’ll bet I’m the first to use Doré for it. Teach that poor bastard to die and let his copyrights run out.

Pine 4x4s… 1 shekel.

60-penny nails… 3 denarii.

Dying on the cross to save mankind… Priceless.

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Discussion

Comments


Vagrant

Re: Sunday school supplement #7: the value

Is that corrected for purchasing power parity?

By Vagrant on 10 June 2007 · 11:05
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Ashley

Re: Sunday school supplement #7: the value

No. It’s a sad example of the language writing the joke. Denarii and shekels were the only currency I knew and 1 and 3 were easy counts to “speak.” The values are probably much higher than they should be for the materials for one crucifixion; “recycle,” we always say around here. That’s okay though, the price of the souls being saved is at such a discount—owing to the persistent buyers’ market—that no part of the economics involved will ever tally sensibly.

By Ashley on 11 June 2007 · 00:29
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chris holmes

Re: Sunday school supplement #7: the value

Magnificent use of the Dore, plus I had NOT come across this slant, tho' it is so obvious when you think of it. But what adds the final touch are the two preceding and very Pythonesque comments, including Sedition's characteristic deadpan delivery over currency conversion and soul-saving count.

It conjures images of the Dore hanging in all its magnificence in some magisterial gallery and cloth-capped Pete and Dud popping in for quick peek and this exchange taking place. Scruggs as Moore, of course, so that Ashley 'Cook' can take take the 'power parity' cue and run gleefully for touch, milking it for all its worth, as he does here.

If it really *had* been a Pete/Dudley sketch on the tele, the phone lines would have glowed red and the national grid gone for a burton.

By chris holmes on 11 June 2007 · 02:49
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Vagrant

Re: Sunday school supplement #7: the value

Regarding that buyers market, I fully agree. The latter day Ecclesiastes of the church I attend said, "Any old soul is worth saving, at least to a priest; but not every soul is worth buying". Simple and apothegmatic, but none the less wise for all that.

The purchasing power query was mostly facetious. It sprang from my own concern that the money changers who were supposedly whipped from the temple may have been badly misrepresented -- as well as brutally treated. Rigid sanctimony does go hand in hand with insane violence and the dude's followers are hard to see as anything but volume after volume of indictments. So, while I don't want to get into apologetics for the state or the hierarchies of hierophants, there does appear to be some missing context to the crucifixion narrative. There's always been more to keeping a church viable than buggering children and fleecing the rubes.

Vigilante floggings of low level employees aren't helpful. I'm not saying the dude should have worked within the system, but his beef was with the executive veeps, then further up the food chain to the board member sharks.

By Vagrant on 11 June 2007 · 06:04
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